Silent Film Matinee Idol Wallace Reid Vintage 1910s Autographed Photograph Rare

Silent Film Matinee Idol Wallace Reid Vintage 1910s Autographed Photograph Rare

Silent Film Matinee Idol Wallace Reid Vintage 1910s Autographed Photograph Rare

Silent Film Matinee Idol Wallace Reid Vintage 1910s Autographed Photograph Rare

Silent Film Matinee Idol Wallace Reid Vintage 1910s Autographed Photograph Rare

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin-up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: This is a 1910s vintage and original silver gelatin photograph of early silent film matinee idol and tragic Hollywood star Wallace Reid. Reid had a strong desire to work in film, albeit behind the camera, but his vigorous good looks meant studios only wanted him on screen. Dubbed “The Screen’s Most Perfect Lover”, Reid starred in over 200 films, his most popular had him portraying onscreen daredevils and engaging in wild car chases. His struggle with alcoholism and a studio caused morphine habit led Reid to die at the young age of 31 in January, 1923. His death followed two other major scandals for Paramount Pictures in 1922, including the murder of William Desmond Taylor and the highly publicized trial of Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle. These events highlighted the hedonism and excess of silent era Hollywood that had previously gone unchecked. This pensive and emotional view is a brilliant pictorialist portrait by the Hoover Art Co. And has been autographed by Reid in purple ink to read: To Helene / With my very best / Wally. We do not have a third party COA, but guarantee it to be 100% hand signed by Wallace Reid. A rare and historical piece of Hollywood yesteryear. Measures 7 1/4″ x 9 1/2″ on a matte double weight paper stock. The autograph was done in purple ink and remains crisp and bold without any fading, smearing or smudging. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Guaranteed to be 100% vintage and original from Grapefruit Moon Gallery. The son of writer-theater producer-director-actor Hal Reid, Wallace was on stage by the age of four in the act with his parents. He spent most of his early years, not on the stage, but in private schools where he excelled in music and athletics. In 1910, his father went to the Chicago studio of “Selig Polyscope Company” and Wallace decided that he wanted to be a cameraman. However, with his athletic good looks, he was often put in front of the camera instead of behind – a situation that he disliked. His first film before the camera was The Phoenix (1910), where he played the role of the young reporter. Wallace preferred to be a cameraman, a writer, a director – anything but an actor. He took his fathers play “The Confession” to Vitagraph where he wanted to write and direct the film. Wallace ended up also acting in it. Starting with bit parts in various films, Wallace was eventually cast as the leading man to Florence Turner in numerous films. Wallace next moved on to “Reliance” where he acted, but also wrote screenplays. His next big move was to Hollywood, where he was hired by Universal director Otis Turner, as assistant director, second cameraman, gopher and scenario writer. It was what he was looking for, but he ended up back in front of the camera. At 20, Reid was an unknown assistant director. In 1913, Wallace married Dorothy Davenport, one of the stars that he both directed and starred with. Although only 17, Dorothy had spent a number of years on the stage before heading to the silver screen. The roles that Wallace played were getting bigger and bigger, but after appearing in over 100 films, he took a salary cut and a small part to work with D. Griffith on his milestone film The Birth of a Nation (1915). It was after this film that Jesse L. Lasky signed Wallace to a contract with “Famous Players” and he became a big star, but his dreams of directing and writing ended. An alcoholic for years, this situation worsened. His first film for “Famous Players” was The Chorus Lady (1915). Wallace went on to star in a series of pictures in which he represented all that was best of the ideal American. He had parts in over 60 more pictures including Intolerance: Love’s Struggle Throughout the Ages (1916) and The Squaw Man’s Son (1917). But it was the daredevil auto movies that he was most popular at. Flashing cars, dangerous roads and sometimes a race with a speeding locomotive thrilled and scared the public. His auto pictures included The Roaring Road (1919), Excuse My Dust (1920) and Double Speed (1920). Entered World War I, Wallace was 25, six foot one and a crack shot. Even though he wanted to enlist, pressure was exerted on him not to. He was the rock on which “Famous Players” was built and his loss would have materially effect the company. He had a newborn son and was the sole support for his wife, his son, his mother, her mother, his father and also had to consider his status as a matinée idol. Wallace was a star who was worked continuously by the studio but disaster struck on a film site in Oregon. While making the film The Valley of the Giants (1919), Wallace was involved in a train crash and his injuries prevented him from finishing the film. Unwilling to stop the film, the studio sent the company doctor up to Oregon with a supply of morphine so that he would continue working and not feel the pain of his injury. After the picture was finished, he was needed to begin another so the studio kept supplying Wallace with morphine and he became hooked. Coupled with the alcohol, Wallace never had a chance and by 1922, he started entering a succession of hospitals and sanitariums as his health faded. Making his last film for the studio, Thirty Days (1922), Wallace was barely able to stand, let alone act. He died at the sanitarium, in Dorothy’s arms, on the 18th day of January 1923 at the age of only 31. Wallace was the third major Paramount personality to be involved in scandal in 1922. IMDb Mini Biography By: Tony Fontana Frank S. Hoover, Hoover Art Co. Los Angeles and Hollywood photographers recognized for taking photographs of society folks were hired to shoot these images. One of the first to enter the field was a Hollywood-area photographer by the name of Frank S. Born in Lancaster, Pa. 16, 1875, Hoover graduated from the Spring Garden Institute in Philadelphia, where he studied art and became a pictorial painter. He traveled to Hollywood in 1902 to join his parents, who had built the Hollywood Hotel in 1901. Upon arrival in town, Hoover went into business with E. Walker, a Hollywood photographer with a studio just south of Prospect Avenue on the east corner of Gower. Hoover bought out Walker in 1905. In his early years in Hollywood, Hoover became part of its cultural aristocracy. Palmer states in his book, The History of Hollywood, He ultimately established the Hoover Photographic Studio, and for years was recognized as Hollywoods leading photographer. By utilizing original lighting effects, he practically revolutionized the photo industry by producing photographs which exactly resembled paintings. Palmer also claimed that Hoover was instrumental in luring David Horsley of Nestor Film Co. To Hollywood to make pictures, as he explained to him that the sunshine in California was the best to be found in the world for outside photographic work of any kind. Horsley leased the former Blondeau Tavern at Sunset Boulevard. And Gower Street in 1911 to make films. 26, 1911, Los Angeles Times, a listing noted that a building permit was issued for a two-room brick studio on Hollywood Boulevard between Vine and Ivar streets that would be built by Hoover Art Co. This became the studio at 6321 Hollywood Blvd. Hoover soon gained renown making portraits of Hollywood and Los Angeles leading citizens. In October 1915, Hoover held a photographic exhibit at the Alexandria Hotel, which The Times positively reviewed. The pictures show, all portraits, are numerous and delightful, and for the most part have been touched up with original colors in a process invented by Mr. Much of the solidity of a portrait painted in oils is formed in many of the pictures, an effect largely due to the posing, which is admirable. Most of the prints included were portraits of children, including Richard Bennetts three charming little daughters. Hoovers photographs followed strongly in the pictorialist school of photography, with soft focus and lighting. On June 8, 1918, The Times ran a glowing story on the business. This concern started business in a little building on Gower St. In 1905, with a line of photographic reproductions of famous paintings. About ten years later the work of portraiture was taken up, and Mr. Sartov, the president of the corporation, took charge of the operating department. During the past few years, the Hoover portraits have been exhibited in different salons and in every case have taken high honors, and one is being displayed permanently in the National Salon at Washington, D. Where it was awarded honors by the Photographic Association of America. The Hoover Art Company is adding new equipment in apparatus and lighting effects. As The Times reported in November 1919, The trial developed that Mr. Hoover was more an artist than a bookkeeper. Things must have been resolved, because no verdict could be found in the paper. Hoover continued shooting photographs of leading citizens until his retirement in 1930. While he and his family lived at 67 N. Beverly Drive in Beverly Hills, he conceived the idea of constructing an elegant apartment building in the Sunset Strip area. Little did he realize that though he was no longer a photographer, his apartments would soon be a favorite location for film studios to shoot cheesecake photos of starlets out by the pool. Hoover and his wife hired African American architect Paul R. Williams to design a luxury building of independent units at 1220 Sunset Plaza Drive, under the name Sunset Plaza Apartments, the only apartments Williams would design. 13, 1935, Los Angeles Times described the site. The area is circular and the plans call for a group of bungalow-type apartments covering less than twenty percent of the property, while the remainder is to be landscaped and arranged with pools, tennis courts, and other features. In April 1936, The Times noted that, The building will be a two and part four-story structure with basement garage. It is to contain forty apartments in stylized Georgian architecture. California Arts and Architecture featured the building in a 1937 story, as did Architect and Engineer magazine. Apartments came furnished by Bullocks Department Store, and rented to an upscale crowd. Elaborate round robin tennis matches featuring celebrities occurred in the late 1930s, with such residents as Edgar Rice Burroughs, Lona Andre, Anita Louise, Buddy Adler, Harry Cohn, and Wendy Barrie taking part. Trade groups rented apartments as classy meeting locations. Studios employed the grounds, particularly the pool area, for stills shoots. The film American Gigolo shot out by the pool in 1980. Many other celebrities lived there over the years, including Louise, Tommy Dorsey, director Eddie Sutherland, Dorothy Lamour, Carole Lombard, Katharine Hepburn, Charles Farrell, Mitzi Gaynor, Richard Arlen, James Dean, Janis Paige, Virginia Hill, Bernadette Peters, and Robert Forster. The Sunset Plaza retained its classy atmosphere even after Hoovers death in 1946. Forty-three year resident Clare Engel told the 1983 Times, It was run as a very fine country club. The apartments were completely furnished, carpeted, draped. I had a change of linens every day. We also had beautiful dishes. In 1980, residents and preservationists worked to get the building listed as Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument No. 233, because new owners seemed anxious to tear it down and redevelop the land. This procedure bought the building a few years, before the owners demolished it in 1987 to construct a new condo building. Biography By: Mary Mallory c/o The Daily Mirror. The item “Silent Film Matinee Idol Wallace Reid Vintage 1910s Autographed Photograph Rare” is in sale since Monday, January 30, 2017. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Movie Memorabilia\Photographs\Pre-1940\Black & White”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Size: 7 1/4″ x 9 1/2″
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States

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