Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin-up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: This is a scarce, vintage and original exhibition book showcasing the spectacular photo shoots between Diana Dors and Wallace Seawell. This is a unique artifact from the Wallace Seawell estate and is filled with his master photographs bound into a spiral hardback portfolio. This is a spectacular and rare piece of ephemera that has a cross collectible appeal for both Diana Dors and Wallace Seawell fans alike. Books like this were never intended for public distribution. This was used in the Paul A. Hesse studio to give prospective clients a sense of the style and talent that Seawell had to offer. These fine art portraits are perfect examples of Dors’ mid-century bombshell beauty. Each image has been hand printed on a heavy paper stock. Spiral bound with a cover that bears Dors’ name; this has never been on the market before and comes from the personal estate of the photographer. Book measures 10 1/4″ x 13 1/4″ complete with 16 pages of photographs. CONDITION: This exceptionally rare and special exhibition display book is in fine condition overall, though the covers and binding have issues. Specifically, the plastic spiral binding is at the end of its life (it could be replaced) and there is staining to the cover. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Diana Dors was born Diana Mary Fluck on October 23, 1931 in Swindon, Wiltshire, England. She and her mother both nearly died from the traumatic birth. Because of the trauma, her mother lavished on Diana anything and everything she wanted–clothes, toys and dance lessons were the order of the day. Diana’s love of films began when her mother took her to the local movies theaters. The actresses on the screen caught Diana’s attention and she said, herself, that from the age of three she wanted to be an actress. Physically, Diana grew up fast. At age 12, she looked and acted much older than what she was. Much of this was due to the actresses she studied on the silver screen and Diana trying to emulate them. She wanted nothing more than to go to the United States and Hollywood to have a chance to make her place in film history. After placing well in a local beauty contest, Diana was offered a role in a thespian group (she was 13). The following year, Diana enrolled at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts (LAMDA) to hone her acting skills. She was the youngest in her class. Her first fling at the camera was in Code of Scotland Yard (1947). She did not care that it was a small, uncredited role; she was on film and at age 16, that’s all that mattered. That was quickly followed by Dancing with Crime (1947), which consisted of nothing more than a walk-on role. Up until this time, Diana had pretended to be 17 years old (if producers had known her true age, they probably would not have let her test for the role). However, since she looked and acted older, this was no problem. Diana’s future dawned bright in 1948, and she appeared in no less than six films. Some were uncredited, but some had some meat to the roles. The best of the lot was the role of Charlotte in the classic Oliver Twist (1948). Throughout the 1950s, she appeared in more films and became more popular in Britain. Diana was a pleasant version of Marilyn Monroe, who had taken the United States by storm. Britain now had its own version. Diana continued to play sexy sirens and kept seats in British theaters filled. She really came into her own as an actress. She was more than a woman who exuded her sexy side, she was a very fine actress as her films showed. As the 1960s turned into the 1970s, she began to play more mature roles with an effectiveness that was hard to match. Films such as Craze (1974), Swedish Wildcats (1972), The Amorous Milkman (1975) and Three for All (1975) helped fill out her resume. After filming Steaming (1985), Diana was diagnosed with cancer, which was too much for her to overcome. The British were saddened when word came of her death at age 52 on May 4, 1984 in Windsor, Berkshire, England. IMDb Mini Biography By: Denny Jackson Wallace Seawell (1916 2007) Obituary By: Randy Kennedy Wallace Seawell, a celebrity photographer whose West Hollywood home was for decades one of the countrys most productive glamour factories, turning out thousands of portraits of movie stars, singers, presidents, kings and Gabor sisters (all three), died on Tuesday in Los Angeles. Seawells subjects, who sat for him in the pre-paparazzi days, when photographers tried to make stars look their best, included almost everyone who was someone in movies and music from the 1940s through the 1980s: Elizabeth Taylor, Gregory Peck, Sophia Loren, Nat King Cole, Janet Leigh, Jayne Mansfield, Audrey Hepburn, Tony Curtis, Paul Newman, Ava Gardner, Joan Collins and Diana Ross. Johnson, while in the White House, came to Mr. Seawells house to be photographed, as did the Shah of Iran, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, and Ronald and Nancy Reagan. Earlier in his career he was under a personal contract to Howard Hughes at RKO Pictures where he had an office adjoining Hughess. Seawell, who liked to be called just Seawell, made highly stylized portraits for many of the Hollywood celebrity magazines, like Photoplay and Screen Gems. He also took photographs for several studios and celebrity agencies. In interviews, he often sounded as star-struck as the fans for whom his photographs were intended. It was the greatest time to be in Hollywood, he said of his career, in an interview in 2000. You could really get to know the stars then. They threw big parties in their homes, and I was fortunate enough to be invited to most of them. Wallace Lacy Seawell was born Sept. 16, 1916, in Atlanta. When he was 7 his family moved to Sarasota, Fla. Where teachers noticed his artistic talent. His early ambition was to be a painter, but he soon took up a camera and was accepted into a highly competitive photography program at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He later was a set designer and fashion photographer in New York. After serving in the Army Signal Corps during World War II, he moved to Los Angeles and took a job one that would last 20 years with Paul A. Hesse, then a leading commercial photographer on the West Coast. Seawell started his own business in his antique-filled home. He is survived by several nieces and nephews. Besides studio work, Mr. He once served as the official photographer for the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus. For many years, Mr. Seawell shared his home with the actress Carol Channing and her husband and manager, Charles Lowe. In the late 1990s, he became enmeshed in their highly public divorce battle when Ms. Both men denied that this was the case. He described his success as a result of enthusiasm, something not especially hard to come by when taking pictures of Sophia Loren. She was divine to work with, he said in an interview. The aura of the person excites you, and youve got to be excited or you wont do a good job. Obituary By: Randy Kennedy c/o The New York Times. The item “Unique Diana Dors Exhibition Book Vintage Wallace Seawell Pin-Up Photographs 50s” is in sale since Thursday, October 13, 2016. This item is in the category “Art\Art from Dealers & Resellers\Photographs”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Original/Reprint: Original Print
  • Listed By: Dealer or Reseller
  • Signed?: Unsigned
  • Date of Creation: 1950-Now
  • Photo Type: Gelatin Silver
  • Subject: Celebrities & Musicians
  • Color: Black & White
  • Size Type/Largest Dimension: Large (Greater than 10in.)
  • Artist: Wallace Seawell
  • Framed/Unframed: Unframed
  • Color Type: Black & White

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