Sultry Vintage Flapper Clara Bow Large Format Otto Dyar 1934 Glamour Photograph

Sultry Vintage Flapper Clara Bow Large Format Otto Dyar 1934 Glamour Photograph

Sultry Vintage Flapper Clara Bow Large Format Otto Dyar 1934 Glamour Photograph

Sultry Vintage Flapper Clara Bow Large Format Otto Dyar 1934 Glamour Photograph

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: A gorgeous, vintage & original, large format photograph of legendary flapper and iconic silent film It girl, Clara Bow. A seductive art deco, Hollywood Regency view of the superstar by Otto Dyar. This image and several others from the photoshoot were published in the August, 1934 issue of Modern Screen magazine to accompany an article titled Clara Speaks For Herself. This is a particularly luscious and stunning view of Bow. Just a stunning piece of early Hollywood memorabilia and a fantastic portrait of Bow. Measures 10 1/2″ x 13 3/4″ with margins on a glossy double weight paper stock. Fox Films ink stamps; Dell Published ink stamp; Modern Screen ink stamp; and pencil notations on verso. Below is the image as it appeared in the August, 1934 issue of Modern Screen Magazine. Please note, this is being included for informational purposes only and is not included in the sale. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Otto Dyar was born on July 25, 1892 and began his career at Paramount Famous Lasky Corporation (which, of course, was just shortened to Paramount). She shot many unit, publicity and fashion layouts of stars such as Claudette Colbert, Clark Gable, Carole Lombard, Shirley Temple, William Powell, Elizabeth Taylor, Anna May Wong, Kay Francis, Madeleine Carroll, Nancy Carroll, Alice Faye, Clara Bow, Loretta Young, Mitzi Green, Gloria Swanson, Cary Grant, Tallulah Bankhead, Louise Brooks, Gary Cooper, and Fay Wray. He ended up working for other studios and was one of the first photographer’s to do an outdoor setting, which was unusual at the time. This was proposed by eventual Paramount photographer John Engstead. His glamour photographs are as spectacular as any created by the Hollywood photographers of the time, including Hurrell and Bull. Recently, one of his unique portraits of Elizabeth Taylor has been shown at the prestigious National Portrait Gallery in New York. Biography From: VintageMovieStarPhotos (dot) blogspot (dot) com Clara Bow was born in a run-down tenement in old Brooklyn, to a schizophrenic Mother and a chronically destitute, physically abusive father. As a child, she was a tomboy and played games in the streets with the boys; since her clothes were so ragged and dirty other girl children wouldn’t play with her. Her best friend Johnny burned to death in her arms when she was 10 years old. Years later, she could make herself cry at will on a movie set by listening to the lullaby “Rock-A-Bye Baby”. She claimed it reminded her of her small friend. She also told reporters simple, brutal, honest stories about her horrific childhood, which was a big no-no in her day. Mental illness in the family was considered more shameful than unmarried pregnancy. This made Clara a lot of enemies in Hollywood. She entered “The Fame and Fortune Contest” as a teenager. Girls from all over the country competed, and the 1st Prize was a part in a movie. She showed up in her ragged clothes and the other girls smirked at her. The contest judges paid no attention to her until she did her screen test – and then they unanimously chose her over all the other girls. Clara lit up the screen like nothing they had ever seen. She got the part, but it was later cut from the movie. During this time her mother tried to kill her and was institutionalized, where she died shortly after. She was taken to Hollywood by B. Schulberg, who used Clara sexually and financially. He worked her like a horse and paid her very little compared to other stars of the day. Even so, the talented Clara became a superstar, and the first ever Hollywood sex symbol. Clara could flirt with the camera just by looking into it with her big brown eyes and mischievous bow-tie grin. She exuded sex appeal from every pore in her little body and was not afraid to flaunt it. She personified “flaming youth in rebellion”. Her characters were always working class gals; manicurists, showgirls and the like. Her movies did a lot to emancipate young Americans from the restrictive Victorian morals their parents had been raised with. Clara’s characters were unashamed about being attracted to men and went after them with gusto. Her shop girl in It (1927) sees the bosses son one day, and says Oh Santa, gimme him! She knows exactly what to do to get him interested and then keeps him on his toes. Her characters cut their dresses up to look sexier, cut off their hair, drank and smoked in public, and danced all night long. At the height of her career, she received 45,000 fan letters a week, a record that has never been equaled. She was the idol of working girls and the dream of working class guys everywhere. Even though the public adored Clara, Hollywood shunned her. Most of Hollywood’s big names of the 1920s had come from poor backgrounds like Clara, but when they made it big they tended to develop upper class values and personas. They pretended their poor childhoods had never happened. Clara never hid anything; that was her problem. It was later discovered by a biographer that Clara was actually schizophrenic, like her mother. One of the hallmark signs of schizophrenia is a total unconcern with social mores. Clara loved to tell really dirty jokes at parties when the conversation lulled, or make blatant remarks about the size of her (many) lovers to other, more prudish girls. She had very public affairs (her euphemism was “engagements”) with a score of leading men and directors, including Victor Fleming, Gary Cooper, and Gilbert Roland. This behavior horrified her peers, and eventually she was driven out of Hollywood. Many nasty rumors about her sexuality floated around the movie colony, including the one about her taking on the entire USC Football Team one night, which was finally disproved by a biographer, David Stenn. The coming of sound was like an earthquake to Hollywood. It shook up everything. Her fans probably wouldn’t have minded her blue collar Brooklyn accent, since most of them were working class gals themselves, but Clara got herself so worked up with mike fright she had breakdowns during her first talkies. Before she could recover from this, she ended up in court with her private life splashed all over the papers, which didn’t help matters one bit. Her secretary and best friend, Daisy De Voe, was caught embezzling from her. When Clara took Daisy to court, Daisy told the court and press uncensored details of Clara’s sex life, along with lots of exaggeration, which the press automatically printed and believed. The scandal ruined Clara. She had another more serious breakdown and had to recover in a sanatorium. Soon after she retired for good, and moved to Nevada with her new husband, the cowboy actor Rex Bell. She raised two sons, all the while battling her mental illness, and died in obscurity in 1965. IMDb Mini Biography By: redmaeve. The item “Sultry Vintage Flapper Clara Bow Large Format Otto Dyar 1934 Glamour Photograph” is in sale since Monday, February 01, 2016. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Movie Memorabilia\Photographs\Pre-1940\Black & White”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Size: 10 1/2″ x 13 3/4″
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States

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