Vintage Candid 1953 Marilyn Monroe Milton H. Greene Glamour Bombshell Photograph

Vintage Candid 1953 Marilyn Monroe Milton H. Greene Glamour Bombshell Photograph

Vintage Candid 1953 Marilyn Monroe Milton H. Greene Glamour Bombshell Photograph

Vintage Candid 1953 Marilyn Monroe Milton H. Greene Glamour Bombshell Photograph

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: This is a vintage and original 1953 candid and glamorous photograph of iconic and legendary blonde bombshell Marilyn Monroe as captured by photographer Milton H. This is from the pair’s first sitting together in September, 1953 for LOOK Magazine and was the beginning of a wonderful muse/artist relationship. Marilyn’s innocence and beauty is on full display as she gives a dazzling, open mouthed smile while goofing around on set with two of the editors of LOOK Magazine. An all-around fantastic and spectacular Monroe still that is a must-have for collector’s of MM memorabilia. Over the course of four years Greene photographed Monroe in a variety of personal photo sessions revealing an alternate side to her onscreen bombshell persona. This portrait has great allure for any collector of Monroe ephemera and is a beautifully glamorous photograph of the iconic blonde. Measures 8″ x 10″ with margins on a semi-gloss double weight paper stock. CONDITION: Fine+ condition with very minor edge wear. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Guaranteed to be 100% vintage and original from Grapefruit Moon Gallery. Probably the most celebrated of all actresses, Marilyn Monroe was born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926, in Los Angeles General Hospital. Prior to her birth, Marilyn’s father bought a motorcycle and headed north to San Francisco, abandoning the family in Los Angeles. Marilyn grew up not knowing for sure who her father really was. Her mother, Gladys, had entered into several relationships, further confusing her daughter as to who it was who fathered her. Afterward, Gladys gave Norma Jeane (Marilyn) the name of Baker, a boyfriend she had before Mortenson. Poverty was a constant companion to Gladys and Norma. Gladys, who was extremely attractive and worked for RKO Studios as a filmcutter, suffered from mental illness and was in and out of mental institutions for the rest of her life, and because of that Norma Jeane spent time in foster homes. When she was nine, she was placed in an orphanage where she was to stay for the next two years. Upon being released from the orphanage, she went to yet another foster home. In 1942, at age 16, Norma Jeane married 21-year-old aircraft plant worker James Dougherty. The marriage only lasted four years, and they divorced in 1946. By this time, Marilyn began to model swimsuits and bleached her hair blonde. Various shots made their way into the public eye, where some were eventually seen by RKO Pictures head Howard Hughes. He offered Marilyn a screen test, but an agent suggested that 20th Century-Fox would be the better choice for her, since it was a much bigger and more prestigious studio. Her first film was in 1947 with a bit part in The Shocking Miss Pilgrim (1947). Her next production was not much better, a bit in the eminently forgettable Scudda Hoo! Two of the three brief scenes she appeared wound up on the cutting room floor. Later that same year, she was given a somewhat better role as Evie in Dangerous Years (1947). However, Fox declined to renew her contract, so she went back to modeling and acting school. Columbia Pictures then picked her up to play Peggy Martin in Ladies of the Chorus (1948), where she sang two numbers. Notices from the critics were favorable for her, if not the film, but Columbia dropped her. In 1949, she appeared in United Artists’ Love Happy (1949). It was also that same year she posed nude for the now famous calendar shot which was later to appear in Playboy magazine in 1953 and further boost her career. She would be the first centerfold in that magazine’s long and illustrious history. The next year proved to be a good year for Marilyn. She appeared in five films, but the good news was that she received very good notices for her roles in two of them, The Asphalt Jungle (1950) from MGM and All About Eve (1950) from Fox. Even though both roles were basically not much more than bit parts, movie fans remembered her ditzy but very sexy blonde performance. In 1951, Marilyn got a fairly sizable role in Love Nest (1951). The public was now getting to know her and liked what it saw. She had an intoxicating quality of volcanic sexuality wrapped in an aura of almost childlike innocence. In 1952, Marilyn appeared in Don’t Bother to Knock (1952), in which she played a somewhat mentally unbalanced babysitter. The next year, she appeared in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) as Lorelei Lee. It was also the same year she began dating the baseball great Joe DiMaggio. Marilyn was now a genuine box-office drawing card. Later, she appeared with Betty Grable, Lauren Bacall and Rory Calhoun in How to Marry a Millionaire (1953). Although her co-stars got the rave reviews, it was the sight of Marilyn that really excited the audience, especially the male members. On Thursday, January 14th, 1954, Marilyn wed DiMaggio, then proceeded to film There’s No Business Like Show Business (1954). That was quickly followed by The Seven Year Itch (1955), which showcased her considerable comedic talent and contained what is arguably one of the most memorable moments in cinema history: Marilyn standing above a subway grating and the wind from a passing subway blowing her white dress up. By October 1954, Marilyn announced her divorce from DiMaggio. The union lasted only eight months. In 1955, she was suspended by Fox for not reporting for work on How to Be Very, Very Popular (1955). It was her second suspension, the first being for not reporting for the production of The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing (1955). Both roles went to others. Her work was slowing down, due to her habit of being continually late to the set, her illnesses (whether real or imagined) and generally being unwilling to cooperate with her producers, directors, and fellow actors. However in Bus Stop (1956), Marilyn finally showed critics that she could play a straight dramatic role. It was also the same year she married playwright, Arthur Miller (they divorced in 1960). In 1957, Marilyn flew to Britain to film The Prince and the Showgirl (1957) which proved less than impressive critically and financially. The film was an absolute smash hit, with Curtis and Lemmon pretending to be females in an all-girl band, so they can get work. This was to be Marilyn’s only film for the year. In 1960, Marilyn appeared in George Cukor’s Let’s Make Love (1960), with Tony Randall and Yves Montand. The following year, Marilyn made what was to be her final film. The Misfits (1961), which also proved to be the final film for the legendary Clark Gable, who died later that year of a heart attack. The film was popular with critics and the public alike. In 1962, Marilyn was chosen to star in Fox’s Something’s Got to Give (1962). Again, her absenteeism caused delay after delay in production, resulting in her being fired from the production in June of that year. It looked as though her career was finished. Studios just didn’t want to take a chance on her because it would cost them thousands of dollars in delays. She was only 36 years old. Marilyn made only 30 films in her lifetime, but her legendary status and mysticism will remain with film history forever. IMDb Mini Biography By: Denny Jackson For over four decades, Milton H. Greene made his mark as one of the most celebrated photographers in the world. Born in New York in 1922, Milton Greene began taking pictures at the early age of 14. Although he was the recipient of a scholarship to the renowned Pratt Institute, a heightened awareness of the photographic image diverted his attention to the camera and its versatility. He soon apprenticed himself to the famous photojournalist and wizard of composition, Elliot Elisofen. Before long, his keen regard for fashion and the camera found him assisting Louise Dahl-Wolfe, the distinguished fashion photographer known for her unique covers and fashion pages for Harpers Bazaar. At the age of twenty-three, Milton was referred to as Color Photographys Wonder Boy. The majority of Milton’s work in the Fifties and Sixties appeared in major national publications including Life, Look, Harpers Bazaar, Town & Country, and Vogue. In fact, Milton Greene, along with other eminent photographers such as Richard Avedon, Cecil Beaton, Irving Penn, and Norman Parkinson, is credited for bringing fashion photography into the realm of fine art. Although Greene was initially renowned for his high-fashion photography, it is his remarkable portraits of our most beloved artists, musicians, film, television, and theatrical celebrities, which have become legendary. It was Milton’s ability as a director that enabled him to capture the qualities that best identified the subjects persona. Thus making each of his pictures an eloquent unique statement, as he converted his remarkable vision into compelling photographic art. As an artist/photographer, Milton believed that people all wanted to look beautiful, elegant, attractive, sexy! His gifts were his flawless timing and remarkable ability to create a rapport with his many subjects. Though he was shy in person, Milton was fearless and unafraid to create intimacy between him and his subjects when he was behind a camera. The range of Milton Greene’s subjects include such people as Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, Grace Kelly, Marlene Dietrich, Sammy Davis, Jr. Elizabeth Taylor, Cary Grant, Sophia Loren, Groucho Marx, Audrey Hepburn, Andy Warhol, Judy Garland, Giacometti, Lauren Hutton, Alfred Hitchcock, Romy Schneider, Sir Lawrence Olivier, Ava Gardner, Steve McQueen, Claudia Cardinale, Paul Newman, Lauren Bacall, Dizzy Gillespie, Catherine Deneuve and Norman Mailer, as well as countless others. But it was his unique friendship, business relationship and ensuing photographs of Marilyn Monroe for which he is most fondly remembered. Milton first encountered Marilyn Monroe on assignment for Look Magazine, in 1953. They quickly became close friends, and in 1956 formed their own company, Marilyn Monroe Productions, which produced Bus Stop and The Prince and the Showgirl. Their relationship blossomed from an instant connection shared their first encounter to an endearing and lasting friendship, garnered by the trust they shared in one another. Before marrying Arthur Miller in June of 1956, Greene photographed Monroe in countless sessions and was able to capture some of the most beautiful photographs ever taken including the famous Black Sitting. The Marilyn Monroe collection consists of over 5,800 images, many of which have never been seen. It was during this time that Marilyn entrusted Greene with her autobiography, simply called My Story. It is the combination of the book with the rare and vivid photographs Milton created that evoke the legendary spirit of Marilyn Monroe. Milton also collaborated with Norman Mailer on a fictional autobiography of Marilyn Monroe, entitled Of Women and Their Elegance. Later in 1994 his eldest son, Joshua started the Milton H. A company dedicated to marketing the works of his father. Joshua digitally re-mastered the first group of 300 images and released them in Milton’s Marilyn, an autobiographical book telling the intimate story of Milton and Marilyns relationship, partnership and friendship. Milton’s photography won him many national and international honors, medals and awards; among them the American Institute of Graphic Arts and the Art Director’s Club of New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Detroit. One of his last awards was from the Art Director’s Club of New York for his work in Harper’s Bazaar. In recent years, Milton Greene’s photographs and prints have been exhibited in major galleries and museums around the world, as well as represented in a multitude of private collections. Greene’s work will continue to be regarded as representative of an era in time, which may be gone, but will always be reflected in pictures. Biography From: The Archives, LLC c/o archiveimages (dot) com. The item “Vintage Candid 1953 Marilyn Monroe Milton H. Greene Glamour Bombshell Photograph” is in sale since Sunday, December 25, 2016. This item is in the category “Art\Art from Dealers & Resellers\Photographs”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Original/Reprint: Original Print
  • Listed By: Dealer or Reseller
  • Signed?: Unsigned
  • Date of Creation: 1950-Now
  • Photo Type: Gelatin Silver
  • Subject: Marilyn Monroe
  • Size Type/Largest Dimension: Medium (Up to 10in.)
  • Artist: Milton H. Greene
  • Framed/Unframed: Unframed
  • Color Type: Black & White

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