Vintage 1920s Bebe Daniels Decadent Flapper Vamp Large Photograph E. R. Richee NR

Vintage 1920s Bebe Daniels Decadent Flapper Vamp Large Photograph E. R. Richee NR

Vintage 1920s Bebe Daniels Decadent Flapper Vamp Large Photograph E. R. Richee NR

Vintage 1920s Bebe Daniels Decadent Flapper Vamp Large Photograph E. R. Richee NR

Vintage 1920s Bebe Daniels Decadent Flapper Vamp Large Photograph E. R. Richee NR

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: This is a 1920s vintage and original, large format, silver gelatin photograph of early Hollywood star Bebe Daniels. A beautiful display of jazz age glamour portraiture by Eugene Robert Richee showcases Daniels as a tempting flapper vamp. Just a tremendous old Golden Age of Hollywood still from the heyday of roaring twenties glamour and allure. Measures 11″ x 14″ on a semi-gloss double weight paper stock. Photographer’s ink stamp in bottom right corner. Paramount ink stamps on verso. CONDITION: Fine condition with soft corners and some faint, scattered surface wear along the right side of the image. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Guaranteed to be 100% vintage and original from Grapefruit Moon Gallery. Bebe Daniels already had toured as an actor by the age of four in a stage production of “Richard III”. She had her first leading role at the age of seven and started her film career shortly after this in movies for Imperial, Pathe and others. At 14 she was already a film veteran, and was enlisted by Hal Roach to star as Harold Lloyd’s leading lady in his “Lonesome Luke” shorts, distributed by Pathe. Lloyd fell hard for Bebe and seriously considered marrying her, but her drive to pursue a film career along with her sense of independence clashed with Lloyd’s Victorian definition of a wife. The two eventually broke up but would remain lifelong friends. Bebe was sought out for stardom by Cecil B. DeMille, who literally pestered her into signing with Paramount. Unlike many actors, the arrival of sound posed no problem for her; she had a beautiful singing voice and became a major musical star, with such hits as Rio Rita (1929) and 42nd Street (1933). In 1930 she married Ben Lyon, with whom she went to England in the mid-’30s, where she became a successful West End stage star. She and her husband also had their own radio show in London, and became the most popular radio team in the country–especially during World War II, when they refused to return to the US and stayed in London, broadcasting even during the worst of the blitz. They later appeared in several British films together as their radio characters. Her final film was one in that series, The Lyons Abroad (1955). IMDb Mini Biography By: Stephan Eichenberg Eugene (sometimes also just called Gene) Robert Richee was born August 21, 1896 in Denver, Colorado. Richee began his career in the silent movie era. He got his job at Paramount in the late teens through his friend Clarence Sinclair Bull. He started shooting stars while Donald Biddle Keyes was taking portraits in the gallery. When Keyes left Paramount, Richee took over, and for two decades he photographed the studio’s stars including Gloria Swanson, Rudolph Valentino, Claudette Colbert, Fredrick March, the Marx Brothers and Carole Lombard. Lombard so admired his work with Dietrich that she started posing in some of the same ways to get that’glamour mysterious’ look. Richee was the perfect technician for Joseph Von Sternberg, who controlled Dietrich’s career. All sittings were supervised by von Sternberg for the lighting setups, and directed the action just as he did on the studio floor. When Dietrich’s collaboration with Von Sternberg ended, Richee continued to take her portraits, which retained the look of the von Sternberg originals. It could be said that Richee learned plenty from the great director that he used for many of his own stills. He took portrait photographs of stars on the sets of some of Paramount Pictures most well known classics. As his talent became more and more prevalent, he was put in charge of the main portrait gallery at Paramount. He worked with a talented coterie of associates including William Walling and Don English. Richee remains the least examined among the top Hollywood photographers although he was one of the finest–one needs to look no further than his sensational portraits of Paramount stars like Anna Mae Wong, Clara Bow, and Marlene Dietrich among others. From 1925 to 1935 took many photographs of Louise Brooks. Perhaps Richee’s most famous work is a 1928 portrait of Louise Brooks wearing a long string of pearls. Few photos capture better the zeitgeist of the Roaring’20s. Simplicity is the hallmark of this photograph, along with masterful composition. Brooks stands, face in profile and wearing a long-sleeved black dress, against a black background, her face hands and pearls along illuminated. Her bob, with its razor-sharp line across the white skin of her jaw, was widely copied and became one of the last century’s most potent fashion statements. Brook’s career had intermittent highs and lows, but she was one of Hollywood’s great portrait subjects and was never better served than by Richee. Even a tireless researcher like Kobal had difficulty uncovering biographical information about Richee, and it is only after Kobal’s death that a few details have emerged about Richee’s life including his 1896 birth in Colorado. He started at Paramount in 1921 and stayed there twenty years, after which he took a job at Warner Brothers. Richee died in 1972, just before Kobal began exploring seriously the careers of Hollywood portrait photographers. Like Ruth Harriet Louise, Richee left scant biographical information behind but, again like Louise, he left a corpus of extraordinary work that may be seen as emblematic of the best of Hollywood photography. Richee was an inventive photographer and when working with starlets he sometime incorporated props made of plastic, glass or even mirrors, giving his prints a sparkling reflective quality. Portraits of the top stars always had a sheen that was consistent with the studio’s image of smart sophistication. When he photographed Clara Bow, the studio’s number one sexpot took on a polished veneer. Richee has the distinction of being the first photographer to record Veronica Lake and her distinctive blonde locks in his portraits for’I Wanted Wings’ (1940), the film that brought her worldwide fame. Gary Cooper had made more than thirty films over five years when he was cast in 1930 as Dietrich’s first Paramount co-star in’Morocco’ (1930). He was the first male Hollywood star to bridge the opposing forces of masculinity and beauty. Plenty of handsome men had great careers before Cooper, but none so perfectly fused with what had always been considered opposites. Richee photographed him extensively, beginning when he was a touch too beautiful for a young man, and followed his transformation to the exemplar of male virility. According to Bob Coburn, who worked principally at Columbia, Cooper was’embarrassed a little bit at constantly being photographed. He preferred to be in movement in front of the camera. At the top of his game and for unknown reasons, Richee left Paramount in 1941 to go to Warner Brothers. Whitey’ Schafer, who had been in the top position at Columbia, replaced Richee. This change indicated that Paramount’s image was shifting away from the opulent glamour that had typified publicity material released during the two previous decades. Richee later worked for MGM and Warner Brothers. In his role, Richee became the premiere photographer of stars such as Dorothy Lamour, Jean Arthur, Mae West, Gary Cooper, and Fay Wray, William Powell, Irene Dunne, Veronica Lake, Fredrick March, Nancy Carroll, Gloria Swanson, and Carole Lombard. Some stars became so accustomed to Richee they wanted only to work with him. Miriam Hopkins was one of them. It was said she was quite curt and frigidity when Richee was working elsewhere and she had to be photographed instead by William Walling. Walling says: She was being difficult from the moment she arrived, because Richee was not there. Oddly enough, Dietrich herself was much more pleasant when she found out that Richee was on vacation and she would have to be photographed by Walling. Of course, Von Sternberg was with her. Virgil Apger, Richee’s assistant (and brother-in-law) developed Richee’s negatives, worked on with the dryers, and made prints. He recalled: Gene never left a sitting with fewer than a hundred negatives, which had to be retouched and printed. Retouching was the norm by then for all photographers in Hollywood. Richee passed away on April 21, 1972 in Orange County, California. He was survived by his wife, Levaughn Larson. Biography From: VintageMovieStarPhotos (dot) blogspot (dot) com. The item “Vintage 1920s Bebe Daniels Decadent Flapper Vamp Large Photograph E. R. Richee NR” is in sale since Thursday, December 01, 2016. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Movie Memorabilia\Photographs\Pre-1940\Black & White”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Size: 11″ x 14″
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States

Comments are closed.



  • Calendar

    December 2016
    M T W T F S S
    « Nov   Jan »
     1234
    567891011
    12131415161718
    19202122232425
    262728293031  
  • Categories

  • Recent Search Terms

  • Tag Cloud