Sophisticated Beauty Norma Shearer Vintage’29 Large Art Deco Glamour Photograph

Sophisticated Beauty Norma Shearer Vintage'29 Large Art Deco Glamour Photograph

Sophisticated Beauty Norma Shearer Vintage'29 Large Art Deco Glamour Photograph

Sophisticated Beauty Norma Shearer Vintage'29 Large Art Deco Glamour Photograph

Sophisticated Beauty Norma Shearer Vintage'29 Large Art Deco Glamour Photograph

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin-up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: This is a c. 1929 vintage and original, large format, silver gelatin photograph of beautiful and inimitable Golden Age of Hollywood actress Norma Shearer. Often referred to as “The First Lady of MGM, ” Shearer’s image was captured by another notable woman from MGM – photographer Ruth Harriet Louise. The first female studio photographer and a woman who would become the head photographer at MGM knew how to capture the sophisticated and timeless allure of one of Tinseltown’s grandest stars. A true gem that comes from Shearer’s personal collection. Measures 11″ x 13″ on a semi-gloss double weight paper stock. Photographer’s blind stamp in bottom margin. Ink stamp and pencil notations on verso. CONDITION: Fine+ condition with very minor storage wear along the edges and corners. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Guaranteed to be 100% vintage and original from Grapefruit Moon Gallery. She won a beauty contest at age fourteen. In 1920 her mother, Edith Shearer, took Norma and her sister Athole Shearer Mrs. Howard Hawks to New York. Ziegfeld rejected her for his “Follies, ” but she got work as an extra in several movies. Irving Thalberg had seen her early acting efforts and, when he joined Louis B. Mayer in 1923, gave her a five year contract. He thought she should retire after their marriage, but she wanted bigger parts. In 1927, she insisted on firing the director Viktor Tourjansky because he was unsure of her cross-eyed stare. Her first talkie was in The Trial of Mary Dugan (1929); four movies later, she won an Oscar in The Divorcee (1930). She intentionally cut down film exposure during the 1930s, relying on major roles in Thalberg’s prestige projects: The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1934) and Romeo and Juliet (1936) (her fifth Oscar nomination). Thalberg died of a second heart attack in September, 1936, at age 37. Norma wanted to retire, but MGM more-or-less forced her into a six-picture contract. Selznick offered her the part of Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind (1939), but public objection to her cross-eyed stare killed the deal. She starred in The Women (1939), turned down the starring role in Mrs. Miniver (1942), and retired in 1942. Later that year she married Sun Valley ski instructor Martin Arrouge, eleven years younger than she (he waived community property rights). From then on, she shunned the limelight; she was in very poor health the last decade of her life. IMDb Mini Biography By: Ed Stephan Born Ruth Goldstein on January 13, 1903 in New York City. She was raised in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Her father was a rabbi. In the summer of 1925, at the young age of 22 years old, she was hired by Metro Goldwyn Mayer as chief portrait photographer–the only woman doing so for the Hollywood studios at the time. From 1925 to 1930, she many hopefuls, starlets and major performers including Greta Garbo, Lon Chaney, John Gilbert, Joan Crawford, Marion Davies, Norma Shearer, Lili Damita, Buster Keaton, Myrna Loy, Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Bessie Love, Lillian Gish, and Anna Sten. About Bull’s relationship with Louise from’Glamour of the Gods’ book: After Clarence Sinclair Bull was doing the most time-consuming gallery sessions, Ruth Harriet Louise was hired in 1925 as MGM’s portrait photographer. Still, Louise and Bull seem not to have got along, and he never mentioned her in interviews or his writings after she left MGM in 1929. Louise’s work, however, did influence Bull, who started to emulate her soft-focus pictorialism in 1927. Perhaps challenged by Louise’s talent and craft, by the end of the 1920s Bull had matured as a photographer. Though sometimes outshone by Louise in the late 1920s, and later by his colleague Hurrell in the early 1930s, at his best Bull was equal to both. Bud Graybill, who shot stills under Bull’s supervision for over twenty years starting in the mid-1930s, described him in a letter to Kobal (dated 29 January 1978) as’the quintessence of photographers. His negatives were near perfect in exposure… The imaginative work he did over a period of roughly 40 years was never topped. After Louise left MGM at the end of 1929, Bull distinguished himself as Garbo’s principal photographer, which must have made him the envy of his peers regardless of studio. She decided to retire from her career in 1930 to marry director Leigh Jason. Sadly, after ten years of martial bliss, she died on October 12, 1940 from complications from childbirth in Los Angeles, California. From the book’Glamour of the Gods’, it further adds to Louise’s biography: Louise’s brief reign as portrait studio chief lasted from mid-1925 to the end of 1929. To Louise goes the credit of being the photographer who fashioned Garbo’s face into the timeless visage still immediately recognizable worldwide. Just twenty-two when she joined MGM in summer of 1925, Louise lost her job to George Hurrell four years later. Throughout the 1930s she occasionally took private commissions photographing stars such as Anna Stern (in 1932) and Myrna Loy (in 1935). Louise died in childbirth in 1940, utterly forgotten by an industry she had worked assiduously to document. John Kobal avidly collected her original prints and acquired hundreds of her negatives. Of all the photographer’s he introduced in his book in “The Art of the Great Hollywood Portrait Photographers, ” Louise’s career was most in need of rehabilitation. Even her gender, which set her apart from all her contemporaries, had been insufficient reason to keep her memory alive. Louise was among the first Hollywood photographers to break away from the old-fashioned convention of staid portrait shots and introduce the nuance of her sitter’s personality. When she photographed stars in costume she attempted to find something of the character being portrayed. Kobal noted that she was’in the vanguard of the photographers who would revolutionize Hollywood portrait photography. Hollywood portraiture before Louise documented strong personas: Swanson’s glamour, Chaplin’s tramp, Pickford’s waif. Louise took the screen personas of her favorite sitters, such as Lon Chaney and Joan Crawford, and in her photographs humanized them while never letting their star luster diminish. There is about Louise’s work,’ wrote Kobal in 1980,’delicacy, a shy, appealing privacy, that established an immediate bond with the viewer, Her subjects liked her and trusted her, including the elusive Garbo. The two young women worked together, starting with Garbo’s first portrait session in Hollywood, two months before she appeared on the set, through her ascent as MGM’s greatest female draw. Louise’s sensitive touch, along with the work of MGM’s brilliant cinematographers combined to create the face that enthralled moviegoers. There has been discussion in Hollywood literature as to how much Louise relied on full-length shots, which she would then crop to make half-length or close-ups portraits. Kobal may have started this notion when he wrote about Louise. Although cropping was and remains a useful tool in most photographers’ practice, in fact Louise took as many close-ups and (especially) medium shots as any of her contemporaries. Kobal identified correctly that many of Louise’s famous compositions were derived from cropped negatives that found their final form in the darkroom. But Louise’s surviving negatives (numbering in the thousands)demonstrate without question that Louise shot regularly in close-up and medium shots and these also formed the basis for many of her most important photographs. A couple of her relatives were also notables in Hollywood: her brother was director Mike Sandrich (he directed many Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers musicals) and her cousin was silent film actress, Carmel Myers. She took over 100,000 photographs during her stint at MGM and now she is considered on equal turf with other great photographers such as George Hurrell and Clarence Sinclair Bull among others. Biography From: VintageMovieStarPhotos (dot) BlogSpot (dot) com. The item “Sophisticated Beauty Norma Shearer Vintage’29 Large Art Deco Glamour Photograph” is in sale since Thursday, November 17, 2016. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Movie Memorabilia\Photographs\Pre-1940\Black & White”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Size: 11″ x 14″

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