Vintage Large Format Joan Crawford Photograph Eve Arnold Important Magnum 1959

Vintage Large Format Joan Crawford Photograph Eve Arnold Important Magnum 1959

Vintage Large Format Joan Crawford Photograph Eve Arnold Important Magnum 1959

Vintage Large Format Joan Crawford Photograph Eve Arnold Important Magnum 1959

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: This is a large format, vintage and original, silver gelatin portrait photograph of enduring silver screen icon Joan Crawford. From a spectacular series of images of the actress taken in 1959 by Magnum photographer Eve Arnold (sometimes called The Queen series). These photographs offered an unvarnished look at aging as seen through Crawford, following her through the intense rigors of her beauty routine with the smiling vamp image offered here the final result of all that hard work. Wrapped up in fur and dripping in jewels, Crawford was always the picture of Golden Era Hollywood sophistication and beauty. Measures 11″ x 14″ with margins on a glossy double weight paper stock. Magnum Photos ink stamps and handwritten notations to verso. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Eve Arnold, OBE, Hon. FRPS (née Cohen; April 21, 1912 January 4, 2012) was an American photojournalist. She joined Magnum Photos agency in 1951, and became a full member in 1957. Eve Arnold was born Eve Cohen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the middle of nine children born to immigrant Russian-Jewish parents, William Cohen (born Velvel Sklarski), a rabbi, and his wife, Bessie (Bosya Laschiner). Her interest in photography began in 1946 while working in a New York City photo-finishing plant. Over six weeks in 1948, she learned photographic skills from Harper’s Bazaar art director Alexey Brodovitch at the New School for Social Research in Manhattan. This was also the year when she married industrial designer Arnold Arnold and gave birth to son Frank. Eve Arnold photographed many of the iconic figures who shaped the second half of the twentieth century, yet she was equally comfortable documenting the lives of the poor and dispossessed, migrant workers, civil-rights protestors of apartheid in South Africa, disabled Vietnam war veterans and Mongolian herdsmen. For Arnold, there was no dichotomy: “I don’t see anybody as either ordinary or extraordinary, ” she said in a 1990 BBC interview, I see them simply as people in front of my lens. Arnold was particularly noted for her work using available light, concentrating on the image in the lens and eschewing extensive use of photographic lighting and flash. Of this she said “By the time you set up lights the image is gone” in a Guardian interview in 2000. Arnold’s images of Marilyn Monroe on the set of The Misfits (1961) were perhaps her most memorable, but she had taken many photos of Monroe from 1951 onwards. Her previously unseen photos of Monroe were shown at a Halcyon Gallery exhibition in London during May 2005. She also photographed Queen Elizabeth II, Malcolm X, and Joan Crawford, and traveled around the world, photographing in China, Russia, South Africa and Afghanistan. Arnold left the United States and moved permanently to England in the early 1970s with her son, Franklin Arnold. While working for the London Sunday Times, she began to make serious use of color photography. In 1980, she had her first solo exhibition, which featured her photographic work done in China at the Brooklyn Museum in New York City. In the same year, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society of Magazine Photographers. In 1993, she was made an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society, and elected Master Photographer by New York’s International Center of Photography. She did a series of portraits of American First Ladies. In 1997, she was appointed a member of the Advisory Committee of the National Media Museum (formerly the Museum of Photography, Film & Television) in Bradford, West Yorkshire. She received an OBE in 2003. She lived in Mayfair for many years until her last illness, when she moved to a nursing home in St George’s Square, Pimlico. When Anjelica Huston asked if she was still doing photography, Arnold replied: That’s over. I can’t hold a camera any more. She said she spent most of her time reading such writers as Dostoevsky, Thomas Mann and Tolstoy. Arnold died in London on January 4, 2012, aged 99. Joan Crawford was born Lucille Fay LeSueur on March 23, 1905, in San Antonio, Texas, to Anna Belle (Johnson) and Thomas E. LeSueur, a laundry laborer. By the time she was born, her parents had separated, and by the time she was a teenager, she’d had three stepfathers. It wasn’t an easy life; Crawford worked a variety of menial jobs. She was a good dancer, though, and — perhaps seeing dance as her ticket to a career in show business — she entered several contests, one of which landed her a spot in a chorus line. Before long, she was dancing in big Midwestern and East Coast cities. After almost two years, she packed her bags and moved to Hollywood. Crawford was determined to succeed, and shortly after arriving she got her first bit part, as a showgirl in Pretty Ladies (1925). Three films quickly followed; although the roles weren’t much to speak of, she continued toiling. Throughout 1927 and early 1928, she was cast in small parts, but that ended with the role of Diana Medford in Our Dancing Daughters (1928), which elevated her to star status. Crawford had cleared the first big hurdle; now came the second, in the form of talkies. Many stars of the silents saw their careers evaporate, either because their voices weren’t particularly pleasant or because their voices, pleasing enough, didn’t match the public’s expectations (for example, some fans felt that John Gilbert’s tenor didn’t quite match his very masculine persona). But Crawford wasn’t felled by sound. Her first talkie, Untamed (1929), was a success. As the 1930s progressed, Crawford became one of the biggest stars at MGM. She was in top form in films such as Grand Hotel (1932), Sadie McKee (1934), No More Ladies (1935), and Love on the Run (1936); movie patrons were enthralled, and studio executives were satisfied. By the early 1940s, MGM was no longer giving her plum roles; newcomers had arrived in Hollywood, and the public wanted to see them. Crawford left MGM for rival Warner Bros. And in 1945 she landed the role of a lifetime. Mildred Pierce (1945) gave her an opportunity to show her range as an actress, and her performance as a woman driven to give her daughter everything garnered Crawford her first, and only, Oscar for Best Actress. The following year she appeared with John Garfield in the well-received Humoresque (1946). In 1947, she appeared as Louise Graham in Possessed (1947); again she was nominated for a Best Actress from the Academy, but she lost to Loretta Young in The Farmer’s Daughter (1947). Crawford continued to choose her roles carefully, and in 1952 she was nominated for a third time, for her depiction of Myra Hudson in Sudden Fear (1952). This time the coveted Oscar went to Shirley Booth, for Come Back, Little Sheba (1952). Crawford’s career slowed after that; she appeared in minor roles until 1962, when she and Bette Davis co-starred in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Their longstanding rivalry may have helped fuel their phenomenally vitriolic and well-received performances. Earlier in their careers, Davis said of Crawford, “She’s slept with every male star at MGM except Lassie, ” and Crawford said of Davis, I don’t hate [her] even though the press wants me to. I don’t see how she built a career out of a set of mannerisms instead of real acting ability. Take away the pop eyes, the cigarette, and those funny clipped words, and what have you got? She’s phony, but I guess the public really likes that. Crawford’s final appearance on the silver screen was in a flop called Trog (1970). Turning to vodka more and more, she was hardly seen afterward. On May 10, 1977, Joan died of cancer in New York City. She was 72 years old. She had disinherited her adopted daughter Christina and son Christopher; the former wrote a tell-all book called “Mommie Dearest”, published in 1978. The book cast Crawford in a negative light and was cause for much debate, particularly among her friends and acquaintances, including Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Crawford’s first husband. In 1981,’Faye Dunaway’ starred in _Mommie Dearest (1981)’ which did well at the box office. Crawford is interred in the same mausoleum as fellow MGM star Judy Garland, in Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York. IMDb Mini Biography By: Ed Stephan and Denny Jackson, with assistance from Copy Editor. The item “Vintage Large Format Joan Crawford Photograph Eve Arnold Important Magnum 1959″ is in sale since Friday, June 24, 2016. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Movie Memorabilia\Photographs\1950-59\Black & White”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Size: 11″ x 14″
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States

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