1929 Joan Crawford Large Format Vintage Ruth Harriet Louise Art Deco Photograph

1929 Joan Crawford Large Format Vintage Ruth Harriet Louise Art Deco Photograph

1929 Joan Crawford Large Format Vintage Ruth Harriet Louise Art Deco Photograph

1929 Joan Crawford Large Format Vintage Ruth Harriet Louise Art Deco Photograph

1929 Joan Crawford Large Format Vintage Ruth Harriet Louise Art Deco Photograph

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: This is a gorgeous, high style flapper fashion photograph of Joan Crawford by Ruth Harriet Louise dating to c. An opulent sepia portrait done in profile that elegantly showcases Crawfords vamp persona. An enchanting example of Hollywoods jazz age, art deco portraiture style, this is an exceptional piece of Golden Era silent film memorabilia. Measures 10″ x 13″ with margins on a glossy double weight paper stock. Photographer’s blind stamp in lower right corner. M-G-M ink stamps to verso. CONDITION: Photograph is in fine condition with a light printing imperfection running diagonally through Crawford’s hair. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Joan Crawford was born Lucille Fay LeSueur on March 23, 1905, in San Antonio, Texas, to Anna Belle (Johnson) and Thomas E. LeSueur, a laundry laborer. By the time she was born, her parents had separated, and by the time she was a teenager, she’d had three stepfathers. It wasn’t an easy life; Crawford worked a variety of menial jobs. She was a good dancer, though, and — perhaps seeing dance as her ticket to a career in show business — she entered several contests, one of which landed her a spot in a chorus line. Before long, she was dancing in big Midwestern and East Coast cities. After almost two years, she packed her bags and moved to Hollywood. Crawford was determined to succeed, and shortly after arriving she got her first bit part, as a showgirl in Pretty Ladies (1925). Three films quickly followed; although the roles weren’t much to speak of, she continued toiling. Throughout 1927 and early 1928, she was cast in small parts, but that ended with the role of Diana Medford in Our Dancing Daughters (1928), which elevated her to star status. Crawford had cleared the first big hurdle; now came the second, in the form of talkies. Many stars of the silents saw their careers evaporate, either because their voices weren’t particularly pleasant or because their voices, pleasing enough, didn’t match the public’s expectations (for example, some fans felt that John Gilbert’s tenor didn’t quite match his very masculine persona). But Crawford wasn’t felled by sound. Her first talkie, Untamed (1929), was a success. As the 1930s progressed, Crawford became one of the biggest stars at MGM. She was in top form in films such as Grand Hotel (1932), Sadie McKee (1934), No More Ladies (1935), and Love on the Run (1936); movie patrons were enthralled, and studio executives were satisfied. By the early 1940s, MGM was no longer giving her plum roles; newcomers had arrived in Hollywood, and the public wanted to see them. Crawford left MGM for rival Warner Bros. And in 1945 she landed the role of a lifetime. Mildred Pierce (1945) gave her an opportunity to show her range as an actress, and her performance as a woman driven to give her daughter everything garnered Crawford her first, and only, Oscar for Best Actress. The following year she appeared with John Garfield in the well-received Humoresque (1946). In 1947, she appeared as Louise Graham in Possessed (1947); again she was nominated for a Best Actress from the Academy, but she lost to Loretta Young in The Farmer’s Daughter (1947). Crawford continued to choose her roles carefully, and in 1952 she was nominated for a third time, for her depiction of Myra Hudson in Sudden Fear (1952). This time the coveted Oscar went to Shirley Booth, for Come Back, Little Sheba (1952). Crawford’s career slowed after that; she appeared in minor roles until 1962, when she and Bette Davis co-starred in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Their longstanding rivalry may have helped fuel their phenomenally vitriolic and well-received performances. Earlier in their careers, Davis said of Crawford, “She’s slept with every male star at MGM except Lassie, ” and Crawford said of Davis, I don’t hate [her] even though the press wants me to. I don’t see how she built a career out of a set of mannerisms instead of real acting ability. Take away the pop eyes, the cigarette, and those funny clipped words, and what have you got? She’s phony, but I guess the public really likes that. Crawford’s final appearance on the silver screen was in a flop called Trog (1970). Turning to vodka more and more, she was hardly seen afterward. On May 10, 1977, Joan died of cancer in New York City. She was 72 years old. She had disinherited her adopted daughter Christina and son Christopher; the former wrote a tell-all book called “Mommie Dearest”, published in 1978. The book cast Crawford in a negative light and was cause for much debate, particularly among her friends and acquaintances, including Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Crawford’s first husband. In 1981,’Faye Dunaway’ starred in _Mommie Dearest (1981)’ which did well at the box office. Crawford is interred in the same mausoleum as fellow MGM star Judy Garland, in Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York. IMDb Mini Biography By: Ed Stephan and Denny Jackson, with assistance from Copy Editor Born Ruth Goldstein on January 13, 1903 in New York City. She was raised in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Her father was a rabbi. In the summer of 1925, at the young age of 22 years old, she was hired by Metro Goldwyn Mayer as chief portrait photographer–the only woman doing so for the Hollywood studios at the time. From 1925 to 1930, she many hopefuls, starlets and major performers including Greta Garbo, Lon Chaney, John Gilbert, Joan Crawford, Marion Davies, Norma Shearer, Lili Damita, Buster Keaton, Myrna Loy, Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Bessie Love, Lillian Gish, and Anna Sten. About Bull’s relationship with Louise from’Glamour of the Gods’ book: After Clarence Sinclair Bull was doing the most time-consuming gallery sessions, Ruth Harriet Louise was hired in 1925 as MGM’s portrait photographer. Still, Louise and Bull seem not to have got along, and he never mentioned her in interviews or his writings after she left MGM in 1929. Louise’s work, however, did influence Bull, who started to emulate her soft-focus pictorialism in 1927. Perhaps challenged by Louise’s talent and craft, by the end of the 1920s Bull had matured as a photographer. Though sometimes outshone by Louise in the late 1920s, and later by his colleague Hurrell in the early 1930s, at his best Bull was equal to both. Bud Graybill, who shot stills under Bull’s supervision for over twenty years starting in the mid-1930s, described him in a letter to Kobal (dated 29 January 1978) as’the quintessence of photographers. His negatives were near perfect in exposure… The imaginative work he did over a period of roughly 40 years was never topped. After Louise left MGM at the end of 1929, Bull distinguished himself as Garbo’s principal photographer, which must have made him the envy of his peers regardless of studio. She decided to retire from her career in 1930 to marry director Leigh Jason. Sadly, after ten years of martial bliss, she died on October 12, 1940 from complications from childbirth in Los Angeles, California. From the book’Glamour of the Gods’, it further adds to Louise’s biography: Louise’s brief reign as portrait studio chief lasted from mid-1925 to the end of 1929. To Louise goes the credit of being the photographer who fashioned Garbo’s face into the timeless visage still immediately recognizable worldwide. Just twenty-two when she joined MGM in summer of 1925, Louise lost her job to George Hurrell four years later. Throughout the 1930s she occasionally took private commissions photographing stars such as Anna Stern (in 1932) and Myrna Loy (in 1935). Louise died in childbirth in 1940, utterly forgotten by an industry she had worked assiduously to document. John Kobal avidly collected her original prints and acquired hundreds of her negatives. Of all the photographer’s he introduced in his book in “The Art of the Great Hollywood Portrait Photographers, ” Louise’s career was most in need of rehabilitation. Even her gender, which set her apart from all her contemporaries, had been insufficient reason to keep her memory alive. Louise was among the first Hollywood photographers to break away from the old-fashioned convention of staid portrait shots and introduce the nuance of her sitter’s personality. When she photographed stars in costume she attempted to find something of the character being portrayed. Kobal noted that she was’in the vanguard of the photographers who would revolutionize Hollywood portrait photography. Hollywood portraiture before Louise documented strong personas: Swanson’s glamour, Chaplin’s tramp, Pickford’s waif. Louise took the screen personas of her favorite sitters, such as Lon Chaney and Joan Crawford, and in her photographs humanized them while never letting their star luster diminish. There is about Louise’s work,’ wrote Kobal in 1980,’delicacy, a shy, appealing privacy, that established an immediate bond with the viewer, Her subjects liked her and trusted her, including the elusive Garbo. The two young women worked together, starting with Garbo’s first portrait session in Hollywood, two months before she appeared on the set, through her ascent as MGM’s greatest female draw. Louise’s sensitive touch, along with the work of MGM’s brilliant cinematographers combined to create the face that enthralled moviegoers. There has been discussion in Hollywood literature as to how much Louise relied on full-length shots, which she would then crop to make half-length or close-ups portraits. Kobal may have started this notion when he wrote about Louise. Although cropping was and remains a useful tool in most photographers’ practice, in fact Louise took as many close-ups and (especially) medium shots as any of her contemporaries. Kobal identified correctly that many of Louise’s famous compositions were derived from cropped negatives that found their final form in the darkroom. But Louise’s surviving negatives (numbering in the thousands)demonstrate without question that Louise shot regularly in close-up and medium shots and these also formed the basis for many of her most important photographs. A couple of her relatives were also notables in Hollywood: her brother was director Mike Sandrich (he directed many Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers musicals) and her cousin was silent film actress, Carmel Myers. She took over 100,000 photographs during her stint at MGM and now she is considered on equal turf with other great photographers such as George Hurrell and Clarence Sinclair Bull among others. Biography From: VintageMovieStarPhotos (dot) BlogSpot (dot) com. The item “1929 Joan Crawford Large Format Vintage Ruth Harriet Louise Art Deco Photograph” is in sale since Friday, June 17, 2016. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Movie Memorabilia\Photographs\Pre-1940\Black & White”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Size: 10″ x 13″
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States

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