Large Format Vintage Melbourne Spurr Romantic Mary Pickford Photograph Signed

Large Format Vintage Melbourne Spurr Romantic Mary Pickford Photograph Signed

Large Format Vintage Melbourne Spurr Romantic Mary Pickford Photograph Signed

Large Format Vintage Melbourne Spurr Romantic Mary Pickford Photograph Signed

Large Format Vintage Melbourne Spurr Romantic Mary Pickford Photograph Signed

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: A vintage and original late 1910s large format photograph of pioneering Hollywood icon and Americas Sweetheart, Mary Pickford. An exceptional silent film era pictorialist portrait that has been hand signed in pencil by photographer Melbourne Spurr. A wonderful photo of Pickford and amazing piece of Hollywood silent film memorabilia. Measures 10 1/2″ x 13 1/2″ with margins on a matte double weight paper stock. Hand signed by Melbourne Spurr in pencil in the lower left corner of the image. CONDITION: Very fine condition. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Melbourne Spurr arrived in Hollywood around 1917 and worked for the noted photographer Fred Hartsook taking portraits of the early stars. Spurr photographed Mary Pickford while working at the Hartsook studio and so impressed her that she personally helped launch his career as a Hollywood portrait photographer. By the mid 1920s he was one of the premier celebrity portraitists in the world. By this time, though, the major movie studios were mandating that their stars could only be photographed by their own photographers. Spurr chose to keep his own studio, and was eventually shut out in favor of men like George Hurrell, Clarence Sinclair Bull, Eugene Robert Richee and others who worked for the big motion picture studios. Spurr shined in Hollywood for one glorious decade – the “Roaring 20s” – but then moved on to photographing other notables like US presidents, artists, authors and dancers. IMDb Mini Biography By: R. Scott Jacob Mary Pickford was Hollywood’s first superstar. As “America’s Sweetheart, ” she was the greatest screen icon of the silent era, virtually defining the role and influence of celebrity within the context of contemporary society. Born Gladys Smith on April 8, 1892, in Toronto, Ontario, she was thrust into show business while still a child following the death of her father, and she toured in a series of road companies under the billing Baby Gladys. Upon winning a role in Broadway’s The Warrens of Virginia, the 14-year-old was rechristened Mary Pickford by producer David Belasco, and a year later she flirted her way into extra work on D. Griffith’s 1909 film The Lonely Villa. After earning five dollars for her day of work, Pickford met Griffith’s request that she return the following morning with a demand to earn ten dollars daily; the next day she was back on the set, and swiftly emerged as one of the key players in the legendary director’s stock company. Pickford soon arranged for an audition for her friend, Lillian Gish, and within months the two young women were among the most popular talents in the burgeoning film industry. Known to the public as “Little Mary” or “the Girl With Golden Hair, ” she starred in dozens of Biograph Studios films annually under Griffith’s supervision, and ultimately left the theater completely behind to focus on movie work. As her stature and fame grew, Pickford began to take increasing control over her career; she often dictated the terms of her productions, and not even the likes of the prestigious Edwin S. Porter could override her decisions on how best to approach her performances. Her popularity extended well beyond North America; early films like 1909′s The Little Darling were systematically copied in Russia and distributed throughout the European underground market, and although the loss of income suffered by Biograph was staggering, the piracy of her work made Pickford an international superstar. Pickford’s massive popularity made her the motion picture industry’s first real icon, and she parlayed her success into more and more lucrative financial rewards. At the insistence of her manager, mother Charlotte, she demanded frequent raises from her employers, and by 1913 she was also the first of the Biograph players to receive almost total creative control. However, believing herself overshadowed by the powerful messages of Griffith’s work, in 1916 Pickford signed with Adolph Zukor’s Famous Players Company, which in turn charged theaters a premium to screen her movies. Her deal with Zukor was unprecedented: Not only did she sign for an astounding 10,000 dollars a week, but she also netted a 30,000-dollar signing bonus, as well as a significant share of all profits from her films. Pickford honored the deal for less than a year before moving on to an even bigger payday — a staggering agreement of 350,000 dollars per movie — and by the age of 24, she was Hollywood’s first millionaire. Ultimately, Pickford’s fame grew to such unprecedented proportions that no studio in town could hope to afford her salary and accommodate her demands; when Charlie Chaplin, the only other star of a similar magnitude, found himself in the same situation they decided to join forces and form their own studio. United Artists was born in 1919, and also included among its founders swashbuckling actor Douglas Fairbanks, Pickford’s husband. Together they were a virtual royal couple, with their lives at the massive Beverly Hills estate Pickfair achieving a kind of fairy-tale quality. At the peak of Pickford’s success, however, she began to grow restless. Her standing as “America’s Sweetheart” — a winsome image perpetuated by films like 1914′s Tess of the Storm Country, 1917′s Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, and 1917′s Poor Little Rich Girl — began to straitjacket her creative ambitions, and after 1920′s Pollyanna, which cast the 27-year-old as a girl 15 years her junior, she defiantly chopped off her long, angelic curls into a short bob and set about updating her image once and for all. Toward these aims, Pickford lured director Ernst Lubitsch from Germany to the U. To helm 1923′s Rosita, and out went the Cinderella tales on which her stardom rested. By 1929′s Coquette, for which she won an Academy Award, her transformation was complete. However, when 1929′s The Taming of the Shrew proved to be a major disaster, Pickford’s stardom began to wane, and after only two more films, 1931′s Kiki and 1933′s Secrets, her career as an actress was finished. Upon retiring from the screen, Pickford bought up many of her early silent films with the aim of having them destroyed upon her death, believing that their artistic value had diminished in the years following their initial release. She later recanted and donated them to the American Film Institute. Still, her work was long out of circulation, and as a result her legacy suffered greatly. Once the biggest star of her era, her movies’ relative disappearance from the market made them inaccessible for revival and restoration, and consequently her stature among subsequent generations of movie scholars and fans has been eclipsed by figures of lesser talent and celebrity. In 1955, Pickford wrote her autobiography, Sunshine and Shadow, and two decades later was the recipient of a lifetime achievement Oscar. She died in Santa Monica, CA, on May 28, 1979. AllMovie Biography By: Jason Ankeny. The item “Large Format Vintage Melbourne Spurr Romantic Mary Pickford Photograph Signed” is in sale since Sunday, June 12, 2016. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Movie Memorabilia\Photographs\Pre-1940\Black & White”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Size: 10 1/2″ x 13 1/2″
  • Country//Region of Manufacture: United States

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