Exceptional 1934 Large Vintage Miriam Hopkins Art Deco Glamour Photograph Richee

Exceptional 1934 Large Vintage Miriam Hopkins Art Deco Glamour Photograph Richee

Exceptional 1934 Large Vintage Miriam Hopkins Art Deco Glamour Photograph Richee

Exceptional 1934 Large Vintage Miriam Hopkins Art Deco Glamour Photograph Richee

Exceptional 1934 Large Vintage Miriam Hopkins Art Deco Glamour Photograph Richee

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: This is a sensual, vintage and original, Paramount Studios promotional photograph of gorgeous Hollywood star Miriam Hopkins. Dating to 1934, this stunning old art deco portrait is by highly regarded Hollywood photographer Eugene Robert Richee and is a classic example of the glamorous style of the decade. Just an exceptional and dramatically moody view of the southern belle. Hopkins starred in two films for Paramount in 1934, “All of Me” and She Loves Me Not. This phenomenal example of old Hollywood portraiture was once part of Photoplay Magazine’s library archives as well as a part of the Museum of Modern Art’s Film Library. Measures 10 3/4″ x 13 1/2″ with margins on a glossy single weight paper stock. Richee’s blind stamp in the lower right corner. Paramount ink stamps, MoMA ink stamp, and Photoplay ink and date stamp to verso. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Born into wealth in Savannah, Georgia on October 18, 1902, Ellen Miriam Hopkins was able to attend the finest educational institutions including Goddard Seminary in Plainfield, Vermont and Syracuse University in New York State. Studying dance in New York , she received her first taste of show business as a chorus girl at twenty. She appeared in local musicals before she began expanding her horizons by trying out dramatic roles four years later. By 1928, Miriam was appearing in stock companies on the East Coast and her reviews were getting better after having been vilified earlier in her career. In 1930, Miriam decided to try the silver screen and signed with Paramount Studios. Since she was already established on Broadway, Paramount felt they were getting a seasoned performer after the rave reviews she had received on Broadway. Her first role was in Fast and Loose (1930). The role, where Miriam played a rebellious girl, was a good start. After appearing in 24 Hours (1931), where she is killed by her husband, Miriam played Princess Anna in The Smiling Lieutenant (1931) opposite Maurice Chevalier. Still considered a newcomer, Miriam displayed a talent that had all the earmarks of stardom. She was to finish out the year by playing Ivy Pearson in Dr. Miriam began filming World and the Flesh (1932) which was not a box-office blockbuster. Later, she appeared in Dancers in the Dark (1932) with George Raft. The film was unexpectedly strong and enjoyable which served as a catalyst to propel Miriam and Raft to bigger stardom. In Two Kinds of Women (1932) directed by William C. De Mille, Miriam once again performed magnificently. Later that year she played Lily Vautier in the sophisticated comedy Trouble in Paradise (1932). A film that should have been nominated for an Academy Award, it has lasted through the years as a masterpiece in comedy – even today, film buffs and historians rave about it. Miriam’s brilliant performance in Design for Living (1933) propelled her to the top of Paramount’s salary scale. Later that year, Miriam played the title role in The Story of Temple Drake (1933). Paramount was forced to tone down the film’s violence and character being raped to pass they Hayes Office code. Despite being watered down, it was still a box-office smash. In 1934, Miriam filmed All of Me (1934) which was less than well-received. Soon, the country was abuzz as to who would play Scarlett O’Hara in Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind (1939). Miriam wanted the coveted spot especially since she was a Southern lady and Georgia native. Unfortunately, as we all know, she didn’t win the role. As a matter of fact, her only movie role that year was in The Old Maid (1939). By this time, the roles were only trickling in for her. With the slowdown in film work, Miriam found herself returning to the stage. She made two films in 1940, none in 1941, and one in 1942 and 1943, respectively. The stage was her work now. However in 1949, she received the role of Lavinia Penniman in The Heiress (1949). Miriam made only three films in the 1950′s, but she had begun making appearances on television programs. Miriam made her final big screen appearance in Savage Intruder (1970). Nine days before her 70th birthday, on October 9, 1972, Miriam died of a heart attack in New York City. IMDb Mini Biography By: Denny Jackson Eugene (sometimes also just called Gene) Robert Richee was born August 21, 1896 in Denver, Colorado. Richee began his career in the silent movie era. He got his job at Paramount in the late teens through his friend Clarence Sinclair Bull. He started shooting stars while Donald Biddle Keyes was taking portraits in the gallery. When Keyes left Paramount, Richee took over, and for two decades he photographed the studio’s stars including Gloria Swanson, Rudolph Valentino, Claudette Colbert, Fredrick March, the Marx Brothers and Carole Lombard. Lombard so admired his work with Dietrich that she started posing in some of the same ways to get that’glamour mysterious’ look. Richee was the perfect technician for Joseph Von Sternberg, who controlled Dietrich’s career. All sittings were supervised by von Sternberg for the lighting setups, and directed the action just as he did on the studio floor. When Dietrich’s collaboration with Von Sternberg ended, Richee continued to take her portraits, which retained the look of the von Sternberg originals. It could be said that Richee learned plenty from the great director that he used for many of his own stills. He took portrait photographs of stars on the sets of some of Paramount Pictures most well known classics. As his talent became more and more prevalent, he was put in charge of the main portrait gallery at Paramount. He worked with a talented coterie of associates including William Walling and Don English. Richee remains the least examined among the top Hollywood photographers although he was one of the finest–one needs to look no further than his sensational portraits of Paramount stars like Anna Mae Wong, Clara Bow, and Marlene Dietrich among others. From 1925 to 1935 took many photographs of Louise Brooks. Perhaps Richee’s most famous work is a 1928 portrait of Louise Brooks wearing a long string of pearls. Few photos capture better the zeitgeist of the Roaring’20s. Simplicity is the hallmark of this photograph, along with masterful composition. Brooks stands, face in profile and wearing a long-sleeved black dress, against a black background, her face hands and pearls along illuminated. Her bob, with its razor-sharp line across the white skin of her jaw, was widely copied and became one of the last century’s most potent fashion statements. Brook’s career had intermittent highs and lows, but she was one of Hollywood’s great portrait subjects and was never better served than by Richee. Even a tireless researcher like Kobal had difficulty uncovering biographical information about Richee, and it is only after Kobal’s death that a few details have emerged about Richee’s life including his 1896 birth in Colorado. He started at Paramount in 1921 and stayed there twenty years, after which he took a job at Warner Brothers. Richee died in 1972, just before Kobal began exploring seriously the careers of Hollywood portrait photographers. Like Ruth Harriet Louise, Richee left scant biographical information behind but, again like Louise, he left a corpus of extraordinary work that may be seen as emblematic of the best of Hollywood photography. Richee was an inventive photographer and when working with starlets he sometime incorporated props made of plastic, glass or even mirrors, giving his prints a sparkling reflective quality. Portraits of the top stars always had a sheen that was consistent with the studio’s image of smart sophistication. When he photographed Clara Bow, the studio’s number one sexpot took on a polished veneer. Richee has the distinction of being the first photographer to record Veronica Lake and her distinctive blonde locks in his portraits for’I Wanted Wings’ (1940), the film that brought her worldwide fame. Gary Cooper had made more than thirty films over five years when he was cast in 1930 as Dietrich’s first Paramount co-star in’Morocco’ (1930). He was the first male Hollywood star to bridge the opposing forces of masculinity and beauty. Plenty of handsome men had great careers before Cooper, but none so perfectly fused with what had always been considered opposites. Richee photographed him extensively, beginning when he was a touch too beautiful for a young man, and followed his transformation to the exemplar of male virility. According to Bob Coburn, who worked principally at Columbia, Cooper was’embarrassed a little bit at constantly being photographed. He preferred to be in movement in front of the camera. At the top of his game and for unknown reasons, Richee left Paramount in 1941 to go to Warner Brothers. Whitey’ Schafer, who had been in the top position at Columbia, replaced Richee. This change indicated that Paramount’s image was shifting away from the opulent glamour that had typified publicity material released during the two previous decades. Richee later worked for MGM and Warner Brothers. In his role, Richee became the premiere photographer of stars such as Dorothy Lamour, Jean Arthur, Mae West, Gary Cooper, and Fay Wray, William Powell, Irene Dunne, Veronica Lake, Fredrick March, Nancy Carroll, Gloria Swanson, and Carole Lombard. Some stars became so accustomed to Richee they wanted only to work with him. Miriam Hopkins was one of them. It was said she was quite curt and frigidity when Richee was working elsewhere and she had to be photographed instead by William Walling. Walling says: She was being difficult from the moment she arrived, because Richee was not there. Oddly enough, Dietrich herself was much more pleasant when she found out that Richee was on vacation and she would have to be photographed by Walling. Of course, Von Sternberg was with her. Virgil Apger, Richee’s assistant (and brother-in-law) developed Richee’s negatives, worked on with the dryers, and made prints. He recalled: Gene never left a sitting with fewer than a hundred negatives, which had to be retouched and printed. Retouching was the norm by then for all photographers in Hollywood. Richee passed away on April 21, 1972 in Orange County, California. He was survived by his wife, Levaughn Larson. Biography From: VintageMovieStarPhotos (dot) blogspot (dot) com. The item “Exceptional 1934 Large Vintage Miriam Hopkins Art Deco Glamour Photograph Richee” is in sale since Thursday, June 09, 2016. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Movie Memorabilia\Photographs\Pre-1940\Black & White”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Size: 10 3/4″ x 13 1/2″
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States

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