Masterful Fine Art Deco Hollywood Glamour Photograph Martha Vickers Vintage Rare

Masterful Fine Art Deco Hollywood Glamour Photograph Martha Vickers Vintage Rare

Masterful Fine Art Deco Hollywood Glamour Photograph Martha Vickers Vintage Rare

We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changed assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. All sell no reserve! ITEM: A patriotic, vintage and original gelatin silver photograph dating to the mid 1940s of the beautiful and mysterious Hollywood actress Martha Vickers. This classic art deco glamour pin-up portrait shows a dramatically lit and flawless Vickers, on a satin divan in risqué gown. On a double weight matte paperstock, measuring 8″ x 10″ this is one of the most well known images of Vickers (and for good reason), and is just stunning. CONDITION: Very fine condition with one nick in margin. Image area is glassy and shows no apparent concerns. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Lovely, auburn-haired Martha Vickers (nee Martha MacVicar) was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, on May 28, 1925, the daughter of James S. After attending schools in various states – Florida, Texas and California – she and her family settled on the West Coast. A raving beauty, she broke into the entertainment field as a model for still photographer William Mortenson. This attracted the interest of David O. Selznick and she signed a starlet contract with him, but nothing came of it. Universal took over her contract where she was groomed in inauspicious bit parts such as her corpse/victim in Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943), and in such low-level entries as Captive Wild Woman (1943) and The Mummy’s Ghost (1944). In between assignments, Martha earned WWII pin-up exposure in such magazines as Yank: The Army Weekly. RKO gave her some higher-level billing chances with Marine Raiders (1944) and The Falcon in Mexico (1944), but it was Warner Bros. That put her officially on the map. The enticing Martha earned celebrity status and a new stage moniker when she generated some real heat as Lauren Bacall’s wild, thumb-sucking sister Carmen in the film noir classic The Big Sleep (1946), which also starred Humphrey Bogart, playing the teenage nymphet “bad girl” for all it was worth. This major success quickly led to other “B” roles and not necessarily all “bad girl” parts. Highly appealing as the second femme lead in the pleasant musical The Time, the Place and the Girl (1946), Martha looked radiant but was overlooked for bigger things. She continued on and disrupted the proceedings again in the atmospheric film noir The Man I Love (1947) with Ida Lupino and finally earned leading lady status in That Way with Women (1947) opposite Dane Clark. Very much a part of the Hollywood dating scene, which included actor James Stewart and director Frederick De Cordova, Martha finally married producer A. Lyles in March of 1948, but the marriage was over within a couple of months. Post-war films included Love and Learn (1947), another film noir piece Ruthless (1948), and the melodrama Bad Boy (1949), which was Audie Murphy’s first starring role. She ended the decade top-lining the “Poverty-Row” drama Alimony (1949). Surprisingly, Martha’s high-profiled second marriage in 1949 to film star Mickey Rooney (she was his third wife) did not advance her career. In fact, Martha was not seen in films at all during this period. Despite the couple having a son, Teddy Rooney, the next year (1950), Rooney had already hit the nadir of his career and had turned excessively to the bottle. Her marriage to Rooney would be short-lived as well. The momentum, however, was gone and the movie did nothing to generate new interest. She did move, however, into TV and performed effectively in a number of dramatic showcases. She and Rojas had two children, Tina and Tessa. In 1960, Martha did her last filming with the western Four Fast Guns (1960) and after guesting on a couple of episodes of the TV series “The Rebel, ” ended her career. Not much was heard from this sultry beauty until her death from cancer in 1971 at age 46 in Hollywood, California. IMDb Mini Biography By: Gary Brumburgh Bert Longworth, Biography By: Mary Mallory In the last forty years, movie collectors and photography connoisseurs have recognized the art and value of Hollywood still photography, most particularly in the gloriously lit and composed portraits of glamorous stars. For decades, however, many people, including industryites, failed to recognize the skill and talent of the many photographers shaping the publics perception of celebrities through their skillful work behind the camera. Early motion picture stills were just that, freeze frames of the actors posing in scenes from a feature film. These early shots, mostly 5×7 images, were photographed by the films cinematographer. Studios and stars arranged for publicity portraits with such people as Fred Hartsook, Albert Witzel, Nelson Evans, Melbourne Spurr, etc. For images to be employed by newspapers and magazines in promoting actors. By the 1920s, some major stars employed their own stills photographers. Hart hired Junius June Estep, and Mary Pickford exclusively used K. Soon, studios set up their own portrait galleries and hired their own exclusive photographers to shoot scene stills. Roman and Jack Freulich worked and led Universals studio gallery, Clarence Sinclair Bull headed Metro-Goldwyn-Mayers, assisted by Ruth Harriet Louise, Donald Biddle Keyes and Eugene Robert Richee shot portraits and stills at Paramount, Max Munn Autrey was employed by Fox Films. As the studio system came into place with the advent of talkies, studios hired many stillsmen to take scene stills, off-camera images, and candids of both above and below the line talent. Photographers took massive amounts of stills around the lot, at public events, premieres, at homes, in posed shots, to be widely distributed to magazines and newspapers for free publicity promoting upcoming films, new talent, and established stars. The journals, fan magazines, and newspapers splashed these images throughout their pages, building awareness and star popularity. Bert Buddy Longworth was one of the stills photographers taking these images. Longworth began his career shooting scene stills at MGM for Greta Garbos first three films, including Flesh and the Devil, with Longworth capturing the passion of Garbo and John Gilbert as they fell in love. He was employed for a short time at Paramount, but from 1929 on, he worked at Warner Bros. As an action specialist, working on Busby Berkeleys spectacular musicals, crime pictures, off-set candids, as well as portraits. Scholar David Shields calls him Hollywoods foremost expressionist, often using unusual perspective, occasional use of multiple exposures. One of Longworths dreams was to publish a book of his still photography called Hold Still, Hollywood, something virtually unheard of for film and Hollywood photography at the time. One such person he approached was actress Wynne Gibson, inquiring whether she would help him publish his work. Each edition would be leather bound, consisting of 95 pages of photographs, an introduction page (some signed), a foreword by Mervyn LeRoy, and a biography of Longworth, with the subscribers name stamped in gold leaf on the cover. This was basically the first time that a photographer was displaying his output as a work of art to the general public, demonstrating the hard work and artistry involved in creating glamorous and sexy gods and goddesses of the silver screen. Hold Still, Hollywood also pointed out to actors how much their onscreen personas and public perceptions were shaped by Hollywoods lenses. In late 1937, Longworth published a limited first run edition of 1,000 books, 500 numbered and signed, bound in soft leather. International Photographer, the trade journal of Hollywoods still community and Local 659, noted the books release with an excellent review noting his outstanding work. This achievement by the veteran stillsman, who is known particularly to the folks of the Warners lot, serves to bring out in sharp contrast the results obtained under favorable conditions by the expert Hollywood still photographers and the usual experience of the average worker under the present still photography setup in the major studios. The article went on to say that there was room for improvement in general stills photography if publicity departments worked more closely with photographers, allowing them a voice in how to print and crop the images and how they should be used. Longworth hoped to win studio photographers greater recognition and regard for their work. He chaired a committee for Local 659 that presented the first stills exhibit and ball at the Blossom Room of the Roosevelt Hotel on February 21, 1939. John Leroy Johnston, chair of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences publicity committee, followed up on this idea by convincing the Academy to host a stills show to honor the outstanding work of photographers in a variety of categories, as a way to improve the work and equipment of the photographers and as a way to publicize the entertainment industry. The Academy Stills Show occurred in 1941, 1942, 1943, and 1947, with the winning photographers in each category receiving gold medals for their work. Biography By: Mary Mallory c/o The Daily Mirror. The item “Masterful Fine Art Deco Hollywood Glamour Photograph Martha Vickers Vintage Rare” is in sale since Thursday, January 07, 2016. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Movie Memorabilia\Photographs\1940-49\Black & White”. The seller is “grapefruitmoongallery” and is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Size: 8″ x 10″
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States

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